IT'S TRUE. ADULTS CAN HAVE ADHD, TOO.

Do you find yourself experiencing difficulty with organizing daily tasks as well as detailed planning?

  • Are you often distracted?
  • Do you notice yourself fidgeting often?
  • Do you have a tendency to talk over people?
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    Home

    When they’re at home, adults with ADHD may find that their symptoms can often make it more difficult to be on time for important family appointments, for community, school, or social activities, and to finish household chores.

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    Work

    In the workplace, adults with ADHD can often experience symptoms that interfere with organizing, and even communicating with colleagues. In addition, ADHD can also make it more challenging to complete tasks at work and follow instructions. For instance, adults at work may say things like “I often forget to complete some of my weekly assignments.”

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    Social

    When they’re in social situations, adults with ADHD may experience symptoms like interrupting friends, talking excessively, or losing track of conversations easily. Adults with ADHD may frequently lose focus. In addition they may also experience difficulty organizing activities, keeping appointments, and arriving on time to events with friends.

AS AN ADULT, ADHD SYMPTOMS
CAN AFFECT YOU IN VARIOUS SITUATIONS:

From running late for meetings to feeling restless at home. From fidgeting during brunch with friends to talking excessively during a movie.  From leaving laundry half-finished to avoiding complicated paperwork. Adults with ADHD may find that their symptoms impact them at different points during their day. ADHD may play a role even in situations they may not expect, like at work and in social situations. While all adults may experience some of these symptoms, those with ADHD experience them more frequently and to a greater extent.

ADHD has 3 core symptoms

What can ADHD symptoms in adults look like?

  • inattention

    Inattention:

    • Losing your keys frequently
    • Trouble staying focused at work
    • Difficulty finishing what you start at home
  • hyperactivity

    Hyperactivity:

    • Constantly feeling restless
    • Frequently talking too much at social events
  • impulsivity

    Impulsivity:

    • Interrupting co-workers a lot
    • Finishing other people's sentences
    • Difficulty standing in checkout lines at stores

Having some of these symptoms does not necessarily mean you have ADHD. Only a health care professional can accurately diagnose ADHD.

See All the Symptoms of ADHD

Concerned about ADHD?
Complete the ADHD Checklist

When it comes to ADHD, people of different ages can show the same symptoms in different ways.

The following checklist can be used as a starting point to help you recognize ADHD symptoms, but is not meant to replace talking with a trained health care professional. Talking with your doctor can help you better understand the condition as well as ease some of your concerns.

Please keep in mind, an accurate diagnosis can be made only with a thorough clinical evaluation. You may want to find a quiet spot and take a few minutes to complete this checklist. Your responses can help provide a high-level description of some of the symptoms for a health care professional. Regardless of your responses, if you are concerned about the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults, be sure to talk with your doctor.


Move the slider to select the answer that best describes your actions and behaviors over the past 6 months.

Be sure to consider home, work, and social settings.

  • N = NEVER
  • R = RARELY
  • S = SOMETIMES
  • O = OFTEN
  • V = VERY OFTEN

How often do you have trouble wrapping up the fine details of a project, once the challenging parts have been done?

N
R
S
O
V

How often do you have difficulty getting things in order when you have to perform a task that requires organization?

N
R
S
O
V

How often do you have problems remembering appointments or obligations?

N
R
S
O
V

When you have a task that requires a lot of thought, how often do you avoid or delay getting started?

N
R
S
O
V

How often do you fidget or squirm with your hands or feet when you have to sit down for a long time?

N
R
S
O
V

How often do you feel overly active and compelled to do things, like you were driven by a motor?

N
R
S
O
V

Your Responses

You have successfully completed the ADHD Symptom Checklist. Please remember to bring the checklist with you to your next doctor's appointment.

E-mail your adhd symptom
checklist responses

*E-mail must be in the form of someone@example.com

Send a copy of your responses to your e-mail and share them with your doctor.

Please keep in mind, we'll never give out your name or e-mail address without your permission.

Your ADHD Symptom Checklist has been sent.

LOOKING FOR ANSWERS

You may be wondering if your symptoms could add up to ADHD. Why wait until your yearly checkup? Make an appointment specifically to ask your doctor about ADHD. Experiencing some ADHD symptoms doesn't necessarily mean you have ADHD. Only a doctor can accurately diagnose ADHD.

TALK ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCES

Be sure to talk about your experiences and not just about how they make you feel. Think about how your experiences affect you while you're at your job, at home, and in social situations.

Ready to talk with your doctor?

This is your chance to discuss any concerns you may have about ADHD with a health care professional. Open and honest communication is key.


TIPS FOR TALKING WITH YOUR DOCTOR

  • Tip 1:

    Think of any questions you may have ahead of time. Write them down and bring them with you.

  • Tip 2:

    Describe what you’re experiencing rather than how you’re feeling about these experiences. Your doctor will evaluate your behaviors to help determine if they fit the ADHD diagnosis criteria.

  • Tip 3:

    Use the Symptom Checklist to help guide your conversation.

  • Tip 4:

    Don’t leave the appointment until you understand your doctor’s recommended next steps.

  • Tip 5:

    Check back in with your doctor to share how you’re doing and discuss if anything has changed.


How will my doctor know if it is ADHD?

The next step could be talking with your doctor. The items below are not the only criteria used to diagnose ADHD. Diagnosis should be based on a complete history and evaluation by the health care professional.

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    Adults must have at least 5 inattentive and/or 5 hyperactive/impulsive symptoms for at least 6 months

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    Several ADHD symptoms before age 12

  • stat3

    Several ADHD symptoms in 2 or more places, like work or school, home, or social events

  • stat4

    Symptoms that clearly interfere with or reduce the quality of things you do while at work, in social situations, or at school

  • stat5

    Symptoms that aren’t better explained by another cause

Experiencing some of these symptoms doesn’t necessarily mean you have ADHD. Only a doctor can accurately diagnose you with ADHD. If you’re concerned about ADHD, schedule an appointment with your doctor.